Author

Susan

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You finally have your online community all ready to go, your preliminary plan is in place, and you are excited to make available a secure, personalized, online home for your association members and nonmembers. Now, what do you do? First, it’s a good idea to remind everyone that the community is built for them – and to cultivate a thriving online exchange, it requires participation and collective ownership. Inspiring this type of engagement is always tricky at first, but if you try hard enough and have a good plan and strategy in place, you will be able to find a few motivated individuals to help get things going. As with most things in life, this community will only be as valuable as what members are willing to contribute through time, energy, content, and ideas. Here, I have put together several suggestions to get started. It’s always a good idea…

I took a walk in the woods yesterday. Not to count steps, calories burned, or even to puzzle out daily life problems. I took a walk in the woods to light up my heart and set my soul on fire. It was a cool, sunny spring day, the woods were birthing new green, and the scent of possibility was in the air (yes, that would include pollen). There is nothing more healing than a solitary mindful meander through the woods on a day like this – as long as you pay attention. You know how you instantly feel better about everything when you enter the woods? Something seems to take hold of you and gently cleanse the unnecessary worries away? Some call it forest bathing or Shinrin Yoku, others a sort of walking meditation. “…when I am alone I can become invisible. I can siton the top of a dune…

As I have written before, not all of us are blessed with work that is related to our passion. The kind of work that doesn’t feel like work, where hours pass, and there is no sense of time. Where hours and days are wholly connected with the moment, and we are in a soul-connected state of being, where there is no sense of time or space. For most of us, we just have a day job. Work that earns us (hopefully) enough to cover our basic needs, and maybe even enough to fund other pursuits. Personally, I have built a very successful career around things I generally like to do, but I have never really loved my job or my work. Someone once told me, “be careful of what you are good at, you may end up doing it for a long time.” And yes, this is how my career…